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Following a bearing and you find a bog

 
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Nik - KOTM
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Joined: 26 Mar 2005
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Location: Somewhere over the rainbow

PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 6:48 pm    Post subject: Following a bearing and you find a bog Reply with quote

A tip for all those who are following a bearing to that elusive box and you come across a bog or something.

The best way to follow a bearing is to look at the most distant object on that bearing you can see and walk towars it - inevitably - an object is bound to obstruct your chosen path

On encountering such an object - like a bog - turn 90 degrees and walk until you are clear of the object and count your steps.
When you are clear of the object, then proceed on your original bearing until you have passed the obstruction and then turn 90 degrees back towards the direction you came from so that theoretically you end up on the other side of the object and back on your original bearing.
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Dizzy
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Location: North Devon

PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good advice Nik,
The other thing is spotting boggy areas before you start getting wet feet.

Most boggy areas are usually where the land is flat and low. Think of the way that rain water drains down the land and then collects at the bottom.
There are many types of 'bog', 'mash' on the moors from deep waist high (sometimes deeper!) to a soft springy feel where water collects underneath the crust of the ground.
Lime green and reeds in a low lying area is best avoided! The winter is starting to draw near now, so keeping you wits about you on the moors is even more important. Stay to the slopes and keep away from the valleys where water collects.

I remember many years ago when I first started letterboxing and hiking around Kings Tor near Princetown. You tend to think that an area like this would be fine in the winter, but no!
Whilst walking back to Four Wind car park and after crossing the stream by the wall I strolled briskly uphill. You know what is like, you just started letterboxing, your new to the moors and being a guy I wanted to show how clever and fit I was (note the 'was'). About 50 yards from the stream I walked straight into a bog (ok, you saw it coming, shame I didn't!). I ended up waist high in boggy weed, my Dad helped me out with his stick and I squelched with embarrassment back to the car park, gaiters full of weed, not forgetting the bog weed inside my trousers! Embarassed
So a tip, don't become a know it all, you certainly don't and nobody ever will!

Paul

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Nik - KOTM
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Joined: 26 Mar 2005
Posts: 2513
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow

PostPosted: Sat Sep 23, 2006 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Recognising a bog...

During a prolonged period of dry weather it can be obvious as it will be lush and an emerald green.

During a period of prolonged wet weather it isn't so easy - my own way of recognising the signs is the bog seems a slightly browner colour and the tufts MOVE.

Also the ground will usually appear very flat with these tufts of reeds/grass sticking out of it.

If you venture into one of these bogs try to remember the route you take as I personally have never yet taken one direct route across any bog yet (thinks of fox tor Mire) and be prepared to back track to find a more solid route.

HOWEVER I RECOMMEND YOU GO AROUND AND NEVER CROSS ONE ALONE.

Fox Tor mire is "easier" to cross as the level of the bog has dropped some 10 metres as it has been drained somewhat.
The wall on the South side was the upper edge of the mire many years ago. (Back in the Hound of the Baskerville Days).
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